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publications

Adversarial Multi-lingual Neural Relation Extraction

Published in COLING, 2018

Multi-lingual relation extraction aims to find unknown relational facts from text in various languages. Existing models cannot well capture the consistency and diversity of relation patterns in different languages. To address these issues, we propose an adversarial multi-lingual neural relation extraction (AMNRE) model, which builds both consistent and individual representations for each sentence to consider the consistency and diversity among languages. Further, we adopt an adversarial training strategy to ensure those consistent sentence representations could effectively extract the language-consistent relation patterns. The experimental results on real-world datasets demonstrate that our AMNRE model significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art models. The source code of this paper can be obtained from https://github.com/thunlp/AMNRE. Read more

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Adversarial Training for Weakly Supervised Event Detection

Published in NAACL-HLT, 2019

Modern weakly supervised methods for event detection (ED) avoid time-consuming human annotation and achieve promising results by learning from auto-labeled data. However, these methods typically rely on sophisticated pre-defined rules as well as existing instances in knowledge bases for automatic annotation and thus suffer from low coverage, topic bias, and data noise. To address these issues, we build a large event-related candidate set with good coverage and then apply an adversarial training mechanism to iteratively identify those informative instances from the candidate set and filter out those noisy ones. The experiments on two real-world datasets show that our candidate selection and adversarial training can cooperate together to obtain more diverse and accurate training data for ED, and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art methods in various weakly supervised scenarios. The datasets and source code can be obtained from https://github.com/thunlp/Adv-ED. Read more

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HMEAE: Hierarchical Modular Event Argument Extraction

Published in EMNLP, 2019

Existing event extraction methods classify each argument role independently, ignoring the conceptual correlations between different argument roles. In this paper, we propose a Hierarchical Modular Event Argument Extraction (HMEAE) model, to provide effective inductive bias from the concept hierarchy of event argument roles. Specifically, we design a neural module network for each basic unit of the concept hierarchy, and then hierarchically compose relevant unit modules with logical operations into a role-oriented modular network to classify a specific argument role. As many argument roles share the same high-level unit module, their correlation can be utilized to extract specific event arguments better. Experiments on real-world datasets show that HMEAE can effectively leverage useful knowledge from the concept hierarchy and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art baselines. The source code can be obtained from https://github.com/thunlp/HMEAE. Read more

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MAVEN: A Massive General Domain Event Detection Dataset

Published in EMNLP, 2020

Event detection (ED), which means identifying event trigger words and classifying event types, is the first and most fundamental step for extracting event knowledge from plain text. Most existing datasets exhibit the following issues that limit further development of ED: (1) Data scarcity. Existing smallscale datasets are not sufficient for training and stably benchmarking increasingly sophisticated modern neural methods. (2) Low coverage. Limited event types of existing datasets cannot well cover general-domain events, which restricts the applications of ED models. To alleviate these problems, we present a MAssive eVENt detection dataset (MAVEN), which contains 4, 480 Wikipedia documents, 118, 732 event mention instances, and 168 event types. MAVEN alleviates the data scarcity problem and covers much more general event types. We reproduce the recent state-of-the-art ED models and conduct a thorough evaluation on MAVEN. The experimental results show that existing ED methods cannot achieve promising results on MAVEN as on the small datasets, which suggests that ED in the real world remains a challenging task and requires further research efforts. We also discuss further directions for general domain ED with empirical analyses. The source code and dataset can be obtained from https:// github.com/THU-KEG/MAVEN-dataset. Read more

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Neural Gibbs Sampling for Joint Event Argument Extraction

Published in AACL, 2020

Event Argument Extraction (EAE) aims at predicting event argument roles of entities in text, which is a crucial subtask and bottleneck of event extraction. Existing EAE methods either extract each event argument roles independently or sequentially, which cannot adequately model the joint probability distribution among event arguments and their roles. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian model named Neural Gibbs Sampling (NGS) to jointly extract event arguments. Specifically, we train two neural networks to model the prior distribution and conditional distribution over event arguments respectively and then use Gibbs sampling to approximate the joint distribution with the learned distributions. For overcoming the shortcoming of the high complexity of the original Gibbs sampling algorithm, we further apply simulated annealing to efficiently estimate the joint probability distribution over event arguments and make predictions. We conduct experiments on the two widely-used benchmark datasets ACE 2005 and TAC KBP 2016. The Experimental results show that our NGS model can achieve comparable results to existing state-of-the-art EAE methods. The source code can be obtained from https://github.com/THU-KEG/NGS. Read more

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KEPLER: A Unified Model for Knowledge Embedding and Pre-trained Language Representation

Published in TACL, 2021

Pre-trained language representation models (PLMs) cannot well capture factual knowledge from text. In contrast, knowledge embedding (KE) methods can effectively represent the relational facts in knowledge graphs (KGs) with informative entity embeddings, but conventional KE models cannot take full advantage of the abundant textual information. In this paper, we propose a unified model for Knowledge Embedding and Pre-trained LanguagE Representation (KEPLER), which can not only better integrate factual knowledge into PLMs but also produce effective text-enhanced KE with the strong PLMs. In KEPLER, we encode textual entity descriptions with a PLM as their embeddings, and then jointly optimize the KE and language modeling objectives. Experimental results show that KEPLER achieves state-of-the-art performances on various NLP tasks, and also works remarkably well as an inductive KE model on KG link prediction. Furthermore, for pretraining and evaluating KEPLER, we construct Wikidata5M, a large-scale KG dataset with aligned entity descriptions, and benchmark state-of-the-art KE methods on it. It shall serve as a new KE benchmark and facilitate the research on large KG, inductive KE, and KG with text. The source code can be obtained from https://github.com/THU-KEG/KEPLER. Read more

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CLEVE: Contrastive Pre-training for Event Extraction

Published in ACL, 2021

Event extraction (EE) has considerably benefited from pre-trained language models (PLMs) by fine-tuning. However, existing pre-training methods have not involved modeling event characteristics, resulting in the developed EE models cannot take full advantage of large-scale unsupervised data. To this end, we propose CLEVE, a contrastive pre-training framework for EE to better learn event knowledge from large unsupervised data and their semantic structures (e.g. AMR) obtained with automatic parsers. CLEVE contains a text encoder to learn event semantics and a graph encoder to learn event structures respectively. Specifically, the text encoder learns event semantic representations by self-supervised contrastive learning to represent the words of the same events closer than those unrelated words; the graph encoder learns event structure representations by graph contrastive pre-training on parsed event-related semantic structures. The two complementary representations then work together to improve both the conventional supervised EE and the unsupervised ``liberal’ EE, which requires jointly extracting events and discovering event schemata without any annotated data. Experiments on ACE 2005 and MAVEN datasets show that CLEVE achieves significant improvements, especially in the challenging unsupervised setting. The source code and pre-trained checkpoints can be obtained from https://github.com/THU-KEG/CLEVE. Read more

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talks

teaching

Teaching experience 1

Undergraduate course, University 1, Department, 2014

This is a description of a teaching experience. You can use markdown like any other post. Read more

Teaching experience 2

Workshop, University 1, Department, 2015

This is a description of a teaching experience. You can use markdown like any other post. Read more